Archive | June, 2008

The game changing technology

30 Jun

This blog entry could have just as easily been named, Brands that Got Punked by Social Media – but that stellar title was already taken by Jeremiah Owyang at Forrester Research.  Check it out – and see if you recall any of those famous ‘punkings’

I must admit – I did not read or view any of the original punkings themselves. In fact, Twitter links and traditional media is how I came to hear about them, and the serious repercussions for the brands. Whether or not C-level executives and the leadership at your organization are buying off on the proactive use of Social Media, the impact of the medium can not be denied. Ignoring it is done at your own peril. It is only a matter of time before Boise Valley-based companies start to feel the punkings.

The list itself was brought to my attention by Augie Ray’s  Social Media Disasters post which does a great job highlighting the need for companies to not bury their heads in the sand about this ‘social media thing the kids are involved in.”

“…I believe history is repeating itself with social media. Just like that point in time in the Internet’s infancy, social media has not yet been understood or embraced by most organizations and brands. Even if the ROI is hard to calculate today, it would be wise to consider the harm done by NOT having an organized approach to social media.”
______________
“Even if best practices are still evolving, I believe two things are vital for large brands today. The first is to begin to act immediately to the threats and opportunities created by social media. Social media is rapidly changing … but that doesn’t mean an organization should wait until everything shakes out. ”
_________________
“The second important message is for organizations to be inclusive when developing a social media strategy. It may be an exaggeration to say that social media will become everyone’s job, but it might not be too huge an exaggeration. As noted, social media has implications throughout an organization, including Human Resources, Corporate Affairs, Customer Relations, Public Relations, Marketing, and Operations.

This last point particularly resonates – there is danger in just considering Social Media as a tool for Marketing or Public Relations.  As communicators, it is our job to constantly contribute our thinking and strategy to the discussion at the table (even if you don’t have a seat at the table!) by showcasing the impact of Social Media on global brands. No one is immune from the danger – and opportunity – that Social Media presents. It is our charge to educate ourselves, and educate our colleagues, on the brave new world.

– Jess

Meeting Alert: Copyright & Web 2.0 Issues for Media Professionals

29 Jun

Heads up on an interesting topic for the next meeting of the Idaho Media Professionals

Media professionals routinely use the Internet as a means of both gathering and disseminating information about themselves and their clients.  A whole new body of laws and issues has arisen in the last ten years that may expose you and your clients to legal liability for copyright infringement, trademark infringement, breach of contract and others.  Learn how to proactively manage these risks on July 10, when Internet and Copyright Law expert Brad Frazer conducts a lively and interactive discussion of copyright law basics (like fair use and copyrighting your work) and web-specific copyright issues like linking, framing, licensing, right-clicking, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

All media professionals, writers, photographers, graphic artists, web designers, video and film makers are all invited to attend. Admission for Idaho Media Professionals members is free, admission  for non-members is $20 or join Idaho Media Professionals for $35 and get into this event and other events hosted by IMP in 2008 free.

On July 10, 2008 at 5:30 pm at The Cabin Literary Center (www.thecabinidaho.org)
801 S Capitol Blvd, Boise

Entrepreneur Meetups – Tech & Otherwise

23 Jun

If you can’t get enough of that Entrepreneurial/Creative Class experience – to inspire you to brave your own new path or implement change in your comfort zone – then make room on your Google Calendar for some upcoming events.

First up, Tuesday, June 24’s TechBoise meet-up – organized by the multi-tasking master Tac Anderson – kicking off at 5:30pm at the newly opened WaterCooler at 14th & Idaho. In addition to the obligatory Foosball table, the event will include presentations by some local tech trailblazers and a familiar friend from the media…

I have asked Ryan Woodings, CEO of MetaGeek and Chris Blanchard CEO of Pronetos to talk briefly about themselves and their companies, what they’re working on right now and the biggest opportunities they see over the next few years.

I have then also asked Ken Dey to speak for a few minutes about tech in the valley from his point of view, having been one of the only reporters in town who was assigned to cover it. (Ken left the Idaho Statesman earlier this spring for a job in the Media Relations department at St. Luke’s)

Then if you aren’t cutting out early for your 4th of July sojourn – swing by the Boise Young Professional’s Monthly Luncheon on July 2 titled: Innovation & Creativity – Characteristics of Entrepreneurs and Intrepreneurs

The Facilitator – Dr. Nancy Napier, Executive Director, BSU Centre for Creativity and Innovation
The Intrepreneur – Scott Plumley, Zions Bank
The Entrepreneur – Jason Crawforth, Treetop Technologies

You don’t have to fit the definition of intrepreneur or entrepreneur to attend – but in case you were wondering!
An Entrepreneur is someone who translates a creative thought into a new, innovative process, product, procedure, strategy or service. Entrepreneurs are risk takers who trust their potential. They turn their creativity into reality by pursuing their dreams and transforming a vision into a strategic plan. They strike out on their own and build small businesses. An Intrepreneur is someone who displays the same characteristics as an Entrepreneur, but remains with an organization as an employee. They generate enterprise for the organization rather than create their own small business.

See you there!

– Jess